Seattle Mariners
Draft History
2018
no protection
14 - Alex Verdugo
26 - Blake Parker
30D - Mike Minor
62 - Pat Vailaka
116 - Daniel Nava
146 - Marco Gonzalez

2017
Edwin Diaz - protection
28 - Raimel Tapia
58 - Trey Mancini
87 - Mauricio Cabrera
111 - Hector Sanchez
118 - Charlie Culberson
  
2016
Ketel Marte - protection
22 - Gregory Bird
60 - Elias Diaz
69 - Hansel Robles
81 - Miguel Almonte
88 - Fernando Rodriguez
120 - Carl Edwards

2015
Chris Taylor - protection
29 - Neil Ramirez
59 - Michael McKenry
62 - Kristopher Negron
73 - Cory Rasmus
119 - Ezequiel Carrera

2014
Taijuan Walker
12 - Alex Wood
15 - Khris Davis
29 - Danny Farquhar
59 - Jeff Baker
78 - Josh Satin
89 - Tony Sanchez
119 - Chad Qualls

2013
Hisashi Iwakuma - protection
2 - Dylan Bundy
33 - Erik Kratz
64 - Tont Watson
94 - Cody Ransom
107 - Raul Valez

2012
Michael Pineda - protection
9 - Salvador Perez
19 - Danny Duffy
24 - Alex Liddi

39 - Garrett Richards
47 - Aaron Crow
129 - D.J. LeMahieu

2011
Justin Smoak - protection
2 - Lodan Morrison
18 - Jake McGee
27 - Allen Craig
32 - Craig Kimbrel
62 - Sergio Santos
113 - Eduardo Nunez

2010
Michael Saunders - protection
2 - Brian Matusz
5 - Chris Tillman
19 - Brett Cecil
22 - Alex Avila
32 - Josh Reddick
57 - Daniel Schlereth

62 - Henry Rodriguez

 2009
Luis Valbuena - protection
12 - Nick Adenhart
19 - James McDonald
30 - Emmanuel Burriss
42 - Nick Evans

60 - J.A. Happ
66 - Micah Hoffpauir
81 - Josh Banks

111 - R.A. Dickey
135 - Mitchell Boggs

2008
Brandon Morrow - protection
28 - Pete Moylan

49 - Eric O'Flaherty
58 - Ruben Gotay

103 - Guillermo Rodriguez
137 - Juan Morillo
 
2007
Kenji Johjima - protection
5 - Andrew Miller
29 - Ryan Sweeney
52 - Ryan Spilborghs
59 - Joel Guzman
89 - Shawn Riggans
119 - Fred Lewis
149 - Scott Mathieson
 
2006
Felix Hernandez - protection
6 - Dan Johnson
25 - Tadahito Iguchi
36 - Al Reyes
66 - Danny Ardoin
112 - Aaron Small
115 - Juan Padilla

2005
Jeremy Reed - protection
4 - Jeff Francis
18 - Guillermo Quiroz
30 - Joey Gathright
56 - Chris Young
60 - Clint Nageotte
90 - Victor Santos
142 - Jon Van Beschooten
150 - Jon Leicester

 2004
Julio Mateo - protection
30 - Doug Waechter
36 - Rod Beck
51 - Jason Kershner
60 - Antonio Perez
105 - Jimmy Journell
137 - Howie Clark

2003
Rafael Soriano - protection
30 - Damaso Marte
60 - Tony Alvarez
104 - Jeriome Robertson
120 - Julio Santana
150 - Andy Sheets

2002
Ichiro Suzuki - protection
9 - Nick Neugebauer
27 - Chad Fox
28 - Ken Harvey
88 - Norm Charlton
94 - Mark DeRosa
 
2001
50 - Morgan Ensberg
75 - Gary Bennett
113 - Craig House
140 - Lyle Mouton
Home
Team Pages
Past Owners:
Harold Katz 1989-1990

Overall Record
Win Loss Pct
2686 2145 .556
Est. 1989
Owner: Brad Buckert - 1991
NBC-Dynasty Champions - 1998, 2002, 2003,2015
Mariners Instruction sheet
American League Pennant
1996
1998
2002
2003
2006
2007
2013
2014
2015

AL West Pennant
1996
1998
2002
2003
2004
2006
2007
2008
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018

AL Wild Card
1997
2005
nbc-dynasty027001.jpg
Seattle Mariners Award winners

Most Valuable Player
2017 - Mike Trout
2016 - Mike Trout
2015 - Mike Trout
2008 - Alex Rodriguez

Cy Young Award
2015 - Felix Hernandez
2013 - Felix Hernandez
2008 - Chris Young
2007 - Chris Young

Fireman Relief Award
2017 - Craig Kimbrel
2016 - Craig Kimbrel

Silver Sluggers
2017 - Kyle Seager - 3B
2017 - Mike Trout - OF
2017 - Salvador Perez - C
2016 - Mike Trout - CF
2016 - Andrew McCutchen - OF
2015 - Jimmy Rollins - SS
2015 - Kyle Seager - 3B
2015 - Mike Trout - CF
2015 - Andrew McCutchen - OF
2013 - Mike Trout - CF
2013 - Andrew McCutchen - OF
2011 - Neil Walker - 2B
2010 - Adam Jones - CF
2009 - Alex Rodriguez - 3B
2008 - Todd Helton - 1B
2008 - Jimmy Rollins - SS
2008 - Alex Rodriguez - 3B
2008 - Carlos Beltran - OF
2001 - Alex Rodriguez - SS
Seattle Mariners

2017: 108-54, 1st in AL West, Lost AL Division Series, Draft Position 26

Overview: I guess there are three questions to ask. The first is how the Mariners stack up with their rival White Sox and the Braves. My answer is that I do not know. I will talk about some relative comparisons below. So I will move onto the second question: how did the team get this good? Or, more specifically, can a team effectively build through the draft? This question is easier to answer now that Scott has put the research on the website for me.

The answer that the Mariners seem to give is yes if you can find a way of gathering enough picks. The Mariners have a high percentage rate of drafting good players, so it seems clear that this team is one of the best drafting teams in the league if not the best. Yet, that percentage is still not great. So, there needs to be many picks.

As far as I can tell, here are the starters for the 2018 Mariners that were drafted: 2011: Logan Morrison, 2012: Danny Duffy, Salvator Perez, 2013: Dylan Bundy, 2014: Alex Wood, Khris Davis, 2017 Trey Mancini. (Note those are all first round picks except for Mancini who was a late second round pick.) That is 7 players of 14 spots (the 9 starters in the line-up and 5 starters). That is half. It seems high, but I do not know how this compares to other teams. Also, it seems like even a bad pick can turn into a good one if you trade the player at the right moment. I have not looked at all the transactions.

The Mariners had a run from 2011-2014 where most of their early round picks hit. The exception, almost, was Dylan Bundy who was the highest pick of the group but he is now contributing. If a team can have a run like this, then it can build through the draft if it gets enough picks and trades well. It seems like teams should value draft picks appropriately.

But is the draft just a matter of luck? Are certain years just better than others? The core of this Mariners team (besides Trout) comes from the 2014 draft. That was a HUGE draft. Christian Yelich and Marcel Ozuna went 7 and 8. The guy taken after Alex Wood was Carlos Martinez. But even in that draft, it seems like there are bad picks or at least picks that did not work out. So it is not just that the Mariners got 2 good players because everyone got good players. Some of those guys did not work out. The run that the Mariners had, I think, demonstrates that draft preparation can help.

This is probably not a revolutionary conclusion. I do think the talent in the draft has been getting better and the research that people have access to is improving. I think an important question is asking what draft picks are really worth and when to move them. I think the Mariners case study is very important when considering this. Anyway, let me get onto the business at hard.

Starting Rotation: Felix Hernandez obviously had a rough year. He gives up the long ball to lefties. But fortunately for the Mariners, he does not have to be anything other than a 5th starter. Alex Wood is an elite ace who can compete with anyone. Taijuan Walker, Danny Duffy and Dylan Bundy in the 2-3-4 spots will be highly effective against many teams. Against the elite teams, though, they may struggle. What is interesting is Duffy is a lefty that destroys lefties and Bundy is a righty that is highly effective against righties. They could be used very effectively in a playoff series. The White Sox I think still have the edge here. The Erwin Santana led Braves are probably on par with them.

Bullpen: The Mariners may have the best bullpen in the American League. Edwin Diaz (who has a closer rating) and Tyler Lyons could both shut down games in a highly effective way. But they are not going to close because Craig Kimbrel will. His card is filthy. Batters get to roll 50% of the time off their cards. But for the most part, the Mariners will end every game after 7.

Starting Line-Up: The line-up has the best hitter in baseball in Mike Trout. After him, the team has a ton of power and is solid 1-9. So they have a remarkable AL-style offense that just keeps coming. But Trout is the only really scary guy in the line-up (unlike the Braves who have 4 scary guys). So this team will beat up on many people and Salvator Perez, Logan Morrison, Trey Mancini, and Khris Davis are poised to hit many home runs. But against elite starters do you want a core of scary guys or depth. We could find out. One place the Mariners could help themselves at is DH. They have Victor Martinez, Ezequiel Carrera and Andrew McCutchen who combine to make an interesting DH, but the Mariners may want to look to upgrade there.

Defense and Speed: Mike Trout is only average in center field which makes me further wonder how center field ratings are distributed. Khris Davis is a liability in the outfield but maybe he dhs sometimes. The team is not slow but only Trout and Eduardo Nunez are really threats to steal.

Surplus/Deficiencies: The Mariners have interesting pieces to move if they so desire. They could cash in Felix Hernandez now to upgrade their #2 spot in the rotation. They could move Andrew McCutcheon to help out at DH. It is hard to say because many of the players they have floating around could be useful. Ketel Marte is a shortstop who hits lefties well. He could probably fit into the squad somewhere, but may also be moveable. But how much should a team move for a possible playoff series. Victor Martinez may be worth moving although he has value for the team.

Outlook: The team is the favorite to win the AL West but we will see how it plays out. In the playoffs, it is hard to say. They do not have weaknesses, but some of their strengths are not as strong as the other teams. But they certainly could go all the way. The third question (I mentioned three questions above) is how long with their control of the AL West last? They seem to be pretty effectively reloading. Alex Wood and Mike Trout are 26. Dylan Bundy and Trey Mancini are 25. Salvador Perez is 27. That is a core of young talent pretty much as good as everyone else. But many other players on this team have just turned 30. If they all fold at the same time, the team will need to go back to the draft to rebuild or at least retool for another run.